“Saptoparno” Pratham Khando, Tritiyo Paricched – by Shri Indrajit Maitra

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4 Comments

  1. tapas basu says:

    ” দারুন লাগল .মনের কথা সেইই পারে বুঝতে
    যে দেখায় আর প্ড়ায় মনের মধ্যে এই আঁচর কাটতে …”

  2. Shubhashis Mitra says:

    It is difficult and at the same time amazing to conceptualize the evolution of Jain scriptures right from our ‘rarh bhumi’.

    Little bit of background history says that this part of Bengal, was traditionally viewed as a place inhabited by non-aryan uncivilized clans, until the area came under the rule of King Ashoka. In his time ‘Tamralipta’ or Tamluk became a rather famous site for Buddhist studies. The gradual decline of Buddhism in India, again made Bengal a place of non-aryans- though by this time famous kings started to rule Bengal. Even in those days Bramhins (the highest in the hierarchy of Hindu sect) were not to be found in Bengal. Ultimately 5 Bramhin families had to be invited from Kannauj to perform important vedic rites for a powerful king in Bengal; the Bramhin families settled in Bengal, and the family of Rabindranath Tagore was an offshoot of these 5 Bramhins from Ujjain who ultimately settled in Bengal.

    Birbhum, however remains a great seat of Tantrik sadhana, probably a derivative of the Buddhist Tantrik Cult in Hindu form. In this place of Maa Tara & Maa Kali, it is great to feel that Mahavira, an apostle of non-violence of any kind, was a fore runner spiritualist to put his foot on; ultimately to culminate by the spiritual search of another great preacher of spiritual non-violence Maharshi Devendranath.

    It is exciting to imagine the whole cycle of spiritual journey of this ‘Rarh Bhumi’; which the writer Indrajit Moitra will elaborate on in due course. I am frankly overwhelmed by this spiritual conceptualization of our own Rarh Bhumi as narrated by the writer starting from Mahavira. I am now absolutely eager to conceptualize and vividly visualize (through the excellent writings) the transformation of Rarh Bhumi in the spiritual plane.

    No praise is worth such an unique attempt., it is simply a brilliant creation, to unfold gradually…..

  3. gtmsnh says:

    Excellent, eagerly waiting for next.

  4. Shubhashis Mitra says:

    In reference to my earlier comment popular ideas says that Jainism is a religion which is essentially Pre Aryan, or Jainism existed in India before the Aryan culture settled in India firmly, ultimately to divide the Hindu clan in four castes after some synthesis. So, Jains, originally belonged to Non Aryan or Dravidian India, and hence they could easily travel to all India including Birbhum or Banga as the whole land was pious to them.

    About the entry of Brahmins into Bengal, the popular myth is King Sasanka of Bengal got into a huge conflict with Harsha Bardhana dynasty and somehow managed to chop off the Bodhi Brikskha in Bodh Gaya. It is said that in consequence of that unholy act, Sasanka became severely ill. His was advised to import a few Brahmins from Kannauj to cure him by chanting chaste Vedic slokas as an antidote, which they did and Sasanka was ultimately cured. The story might be a hyped myth only without much historical evidence, but highlights the conflict between Buddhism and Hinduism at that point of time.

    Thanks to Indrajitda, he has made me immensely interested in history of hitherto unknown India; and specially on Jainism!

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